Call Procedure Like Fortran Example

Call Procedure Fortran like Example


gold 12Dec2018: This page is under development. Comments are welcome, but please load any comments in the comments section at the bottom of the page. Please include your wiki MONIKER and date in your comment with the same courtesy that I will give you. Aside from your courtesy, your wiki MONIKER and date as a signature and minimal good faith of any Internet post are the rules of this TCL-WIKI. Its very hard to reply reasonably without some background of the correspondent on his WIKI bio page.



Introduction


gold Started roughly 2011-05-18. Here is a TCL script on Call Procedure Fortran like. A call statement has some advantages in both the Fortran and TCL languages. In some variants/versions of Fortran, the call statement is used to control program flow and invoke subroutines. For example, a Call Exit could be used to halt the program execution. A similar procedure for Call Return is also possible in a TCL subroutine. For math in TCL, a call procedure or other math procedures can be developed that do require brackets. A call procedure is a possible "sugar" concept for many TCL core commands and subroutines.


Discussion


gold 10Oct2020. This "sugar" concept was initially developed in upvar sugar, Salt and Sugar, Math sugar, Radical Language Modification, and Functional Programming by RS, LV, RLE, and others on the wiki. The call statement may be used to organize programs into a list of subroutines and to exit the program. In the early days of programming, exiting a program was not a trivial function. Usually the Fortran dogma was a conditional STOP or END statement at the end of a punched card deck or subroutine deck, preventing endless loops. In Fortran_4 subroutines some multiple termination statements like STOP;END; and RETURN;STOP;END; were not uncommon. A statement like "call exit" seemed pretty swank to beginner Fortran programmers. Below, a generic TCL program passes control through various dummy procedures. Some puts bye and math statements are used to show control is passing through the procedures.


gold 10Oct2020. A list of "call subroutines" is a simple way to organize a main program with successive subroutines, although in TCL the subroutine procedures usually have to be defined first at the head of the main deck. An alternate method is to wrap the subroutine list into a collective proc. The collective proc can be placed at the head and makes one's organized thoughts more apparent to the reader. The "easy eye" console was used as a testbed for one-liner programs in TCL on Windows 10. Essentially, the experimental code is translating Fortran and Quickbasic control-flow statements into one-liner programs. The "easy eye" console has large black type on green background for bad eyes. It may include an extra Self_help button under the normal Help button of console display.


gold 10Oct2020. A console program was modified for experiments on Natural Language, if the King's English is a natural language. The console program was based on the antique program King Hamurabi.bas, ref Game kingdom of strategy. The idea was a limited set of input commands in the King's English, SVO as subject verb object. The initial commands in the computer game were <king buy 30 grain> or <king sell 20 land>, lower case. English is an ambiguous language in that terms can either be used as verbs or objects. For example, the above term exit could either be used as a verb, noun, or adjective, as in "please exit though the exit under the exit sign".


Timing call subroutines indicates fairly high overhead of about 6 microseconds per iteration. Proc C is using set as substitution, fairly fast. Proc Call math is fairly slow compared to math ops and expr.


Conclusion


gold 12Dec2018. I have been informed that an advanced TCL user has added and checked this Call Exit subroutine into his homebrew TCL interpreter on his local copy of TCL on a PC system. I have added this subroutine code to my local TCL copy. Meaning the subroutine code may be added to source code library in TCLLIB. But I am not sure these subroutines add much to what is already available on TCL.


Pseudocode Section


Using a list of successive "call subroutines".


# pseudocode
console show
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]} 
call initilize                    ;#  list variables 
call subroutine1
call subroutine2
call subroutine3
call subroutine4
call exit                         ;#  stop statement
proc initilize 
return
proc subroutine1
return
proc  subroutine2
return
proc subroutine3
return
proc  subroutine4
call math sin(.5)
return
#  ...   pseudocode: 

Screenshot Section


Screenshot 1


Call Procedure Fortran like Example screenshot 2


Screenshot 2

Call Procedure Fortran like Example screenshot 3


References


More References




Pretty-Print Version

# autoindent syntax from ased editor.
# call procedure like fortran example
# written on Windows XP on eTCL
# working under TCL version 8.5.6 and eTCL 1.0.1
package require Tk
console show
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]}
proc math { args } { set tcl_precision 17; puts [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
proc list_subroutines { variable } {
call initilize          ;#  list variables
call subroutine1 1      ;# set up inputs 
call subroutine2 2      ;# calculations
call subroutine3 3      ;# error checks
call subroutine4 4      ;# print results       
call math sin (.5) 
if { 1 == 1 } { puts "bye bye" }}
proc initilize {aa} {
    puts "subroutine initilize active"
    return }
proc subroutine1 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 1 active"
    return }
proc  subroutine2 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 2 active"
    return }
proc subroutine3 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 3 active"
    return }
proc  subroutine4 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 4 active"
    call math sin (.5)
    if { 1 == 1 } { puts "bye" }
    if { 1 == 2 } { call exit }
    return }
call list_subroutines 1
    #end of deck

# console output

0.479425538604203
bye
0.479425538604203
bye bye

Appendix Code

appendix TCL programs and scripts

Example 2, code scraps

console show
proc pie {} {expr acos(-1)}
proc writer {args } { puts $args }
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]}
call writer "jack" "&" "jill"
call writer jack & jill went up the hill with [pie]
 % console output
 jack & jill
 jack & jill went up the hill with 3.141592653589793

Example 3, Code scraps

console show
proc pie {} {expr acos(-1)}
proc writer {args } { puts $args }
proc math { args } { set tcl_precision 17; puts [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
proc mathx { args } { set tcl_precision 17; return [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]}
call math  5 + 5
call math  5 + 5
call math sin (.5) 
set ccc [ mathx sin (.5) ] 
puts " value $ccc "
  % console output
  10
  10
   0.479425538604203
  value 0.479425538604203 

Example 4, Code scraps

#ref. func proc from https://wiki.tcl-lang.org/14006
#Tacit programming
#Tacit programming.mht,RS
console show
proc pie {} {expr acos(-1)}
set aa 1
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]} 
proc math { args } { set tcl_precision 17; puts [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
proc func {name argl body} {proc $name $argl [list expr $body]} ;# RS
func atand aa (180./[pie])*atan($aa)  ;# RS
puts " [atand 1. ] "


console show
proc pie {} {expr acos(-1)}
set aa 1
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]} 
proc math { args } { set tcl_precision 17; puts [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
proc func {name argl body} {proc $name $argl [list expr $body]} ;# RS
func atand aa (180./[pie])*atan($aa) 
set aaa  [ atand 1. ]
puts $aaa
#end of deck

Example 5, Code scraps


output from console with program loaded,

gold

   call subroutine2 call  ;# returns subroutine 2 active6
   call   ;# returns 0 
   call call ;# returns 0
   call  call call ;# returns 0
   # trivial as zero list, but no errors from multiple calls.

Timing call subroutines indicates fairly high overhead of about 6 microseconds per iteration. Proc C is using set as substitution, fairly fast. Call math is fairly slow compared to math ops and expr.


    time { call + 1 2 3 } 5000 #; returns 6.1238 microseconds per iteration
    time { + 1 2 3 } 5000 #; returns 0.1682 microseconds per iteration
    time { call puts 1 2 3 } 5000  #; returns 7.523 microseconds per iteration
    time { call call call } 5000 ;# returns 12.3354 microseconds per iteration
    time { ::math::numtheory::call + 1 2 3 } 5000 ;# returns 5.616 microseconds per iteration
    # locating call subroutine inside local TCLLIB saves about 10 percent time here
    time { * 5   5   0.017455064928217585  } 5000 ;# returns 0.1928 microseconds per iteration in math ops
    time {  expr { 5 * 5 * 0.017455064928217585 } } 5000 ;# returns 0.1036 microseconds per iteration in expr
    # math ops and expr method fast compared to call math
    time { call math 5 * 5 * 0.017455064928217585  } 5000 ;# returns 20.2576 microseconds per iteration
    time {  * 5  5  0.017455064928217585  } 5000 ;#  returns 0.1912 microseconds per iteration
    time { C 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 } 5000 ;# returns 0.5466 microseconds per iteration
    # proc C is using set as substitution, fairly fast

Example 6, Call Procedure Fortran like V2


# pretty print from autoindent and ased editor
# call procedure like fortran V2
# easy eye console V3, large black type on green
# used as testbed for one liners programs
# written on Windows 10 on TCL
# working under TCL version 8.6
# base one liner derived from
# gold on TCL WIKI , 10Sep2020
# includes Self_help under Help 
# tap of console display
package require Tk
package require math::numtheory
package require math::constants
package require math::trig
package require math
namespace path {::tcl::mathop ::tcl::mathfunc math::numtheory math::trig math::constants }
set tclprecision 17
proc call {args} {uplevel catch [list $args]}
proc math { args } { set tcl_precision 17; puts [ expr [ expr { $args } ] ] }
# successive subroutines of main listed in one liner proc
# foreach list organizes control to pass through numbered subroutines
proc list_subroutines { variable } {foreach item {1 2 3 4 } {subroutine$item $item }}
# translating Fortran and Quickbasic control flow statements
# into one liners programs
proc stop {} { return }
proc end {}  { exit }
proc pause {} { wait .00010}
proc C {args} { set C # }
proc REM {args}  { set REM # }     ;# attack of bots from Quickbasic
proc write {args}  { puts $args }
proc print {args}  { puts $args }  ;# attack of bots from Quickbasic
proc SUBROUTINE {args}  { proc $args }
proc SUB  {args}  { proc $args }   ;# attack of bots from Quickbasic
proc initilize {aa} {
    puts "subroutine initilize active"
    call return }
proc subroutine1 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 1 active"
    puts " fired subroutine $aa "
    call return }
proc  subroutine2 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 2 active"
    puts " fired subroutine $aa "
    call return }
proc subroutine3 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 3 active"
    puts " fired subroutine $aa "
    call return }
proc subroutine4 {aa} {
    puts "subroutine 4 active"
    call math sin (.5)
    write " fired subroutine $aa "
    if { 1 == 1 } { puts "bye" }
    if { 1 == 2 } { call exit }
    print " *******************************"
    REM testing Quickbasic control words too
    print " attack of bots from Quickbasic  "
    print " testing Quickbasic control words too "
    print "  Quickbasic bots now in retreat  "
    print " *******************************"
    # swapping C args  for # comments
    C messege to terminal, operator stop or proceed
    C pause
    C redundant subroutine terminators
    C return control from subroutine to main program
    return
    C stop means stop execution to subprogram or main program
    stop
    C end means end execution to subprogram or main program
    end }
# # successive subroutines of main listed in one liner proc above
list_subroutines 1
call math sin (.5)
if { 1 == 1 } { puts "bye bye" }
console show
console eval {.console config -bg palegreen}
# normally use extra big font 40 and but
# big fonts 30 or 40, rectangle 40x20 do not display well on wiki
console eval {.console config -font {fixed 20 bold}}
console eval {wm geometry . 20x20}
console eval {wm title . " Call procedure like Fortran V2, screen grab and paste from console 2 to texteditor"}
console eval {. configure -background orange -highlightcolor brown -relief raised -border 30}
console eval { proc self_helpx {} {
        set msg "in TCL, large black type on green
        from TCL,
        self help listing
        Conventional text editor formulas grabbed
        from internet screens can be pasted
        into green console
        # Call procedure like Fortran V2
        # testbed  for one liner programs
        # loading math ops, TCLLIB components
        # suggest maintain dead spaces and air gaps near expr, brackets, etc
        # Note spaces near expr statement must be maintained
        # or program deck will not work.
        # blanks _b must be there
        # pretty print from autoindent and ased editor
        # call procedure like fortran V2
        # easy eye console V3, large black type on green
        # used as testbed for one liners programs
        # written on Windows 10 on TCL
        # working under TCL version 8.6
        # control passes in sucesssion through 4 subroutines
        # example >> math .5
        # example >> call math .5
        # example >> call exit
        # example >> math 1*2*3*4*5*6*7*8*9
        # example math 5 * 5 * [tand 1.]
        # gold on TCL Club , 10Sep2020       "
        tk_messageBox -title "self_helpxx" -message $msg } }
console eval {.menubar.help add command -label Self_help -command self_helpx }
puts "*******************************************************  "
puts " console session >>    loads Fortran like call into console "
puts " console session >>    self_help specific loaded in console help "
puts " creating  new commands inside TCL deck "
puts " example >> math .5   "
puts " example >> call math .5   "
puts " example >> call exit      "
puts " example >>  math 5 * 5 * [tand 1.]  "
puts "  *******************************************************  "
# End of deck


Hidden Comments Section



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